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Mourn not the dead that in the cool earth lie —
Dust unto dust —
The calm sweet earth that mothers all who die
As all men must;
Mourn not your captured comrades who must dwell —
Too strong to strive —
Each in his steel-bound coffin of a cell,
Buried alive;
But rather mourn the apathetic throng —
The cowed and the meek —
Who see the world’s great anguish and its wrong
And dare not speak!

—“Mourn Not the Dead” by Ralph Chaplin

Earlier in my life I was a strong supporter of Israel. I wished to become a first generation pioneer with well-tanned and muscled biceps and calves, live in a kibbutz, and carry a rifle, clearing, tilling and protecting the land. Attacks by the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) on passenger airplanes and ships in the 1970s and the violence against Israeli athletes at the Munich Olympics repelled me. However, while in South Africa in the 1990s as apartheid retreated, I noticed parallels between Israel’s treatment of the Palestinians and South African apartheid.

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By a Palestinian artist in Gaza exhibiting thru Windows from Gaza

As I studied the situation more deeply I grew angrier and angrier, aware that my anger might explode and result in hurting myself and possibly others. Well then, Skip, with such strong impulses and your deep belief in nonviolence, why don’t you find something useful to do with that rage? Transform it into fuel. So counseled my still small voice inside.

OK, I photograph, that’s my craft, and make movies, and write. How can I apply my craft to what I now believed was the extremely unjust, immoral, illegal Israeli occupation and siege? And how can I be so certain of my newly formed understanding, so opposed to my earlier beliefs?

Go there, young man, see for yourself. Determine if what you conclude from your studies is accurate, and whether with your crafts you can do anything about it. As Lucretia Mott is alleged to have stated, challenging her 19th century Quaker colleagues, “What is thee doing about it?”

But Palestine-Israel is a dangerous region, I’d not be safe, maybe I’d be caught in a terrorist attack or an army invasion.

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After Operation Cast Lead, Israel’s bombardment and invasion in 2008-2009

Don’t go alone, for your first trip. Find a group you can explore with, stated that inner voice, urging me on.

I was on the edge. Clinching my resolve and hefting me over my fear, in 2002, partly responding to Palestinian suicide operations, Israel invaded much of the West Bank. Operation Defensive Shield utterly destroyed Ramallah, Hebron, Jenin, and other metropolitan regions of the occupied West Bank. I felt this so strongly that I feared—with two minds, one rational reminding me I lived in a relatively safe situation in Cambridge, the other frantic, persuading me I lived in the West Bank—the Israeli army would destroy my home. The next year, on March 16, 2003, an Israeli soldier driving a Caterpillar monster tractor bulldozed and murdered the peace and justice activist, Rachel Corrie, as she attempted to protect a Palestinian house from demolition. My hyper imagination, spurred by the martyrdom of Rachel Corrie, launched me. In October 2003 I first stepped foot in the West Bank with a Fellowship of Reconciliation delegation, my first of 9 trips so far.

That began my work. What has sustained and I hope deepened it? Five major factors. First, close friends, Jewish and Palestinian, in many parts of that land of limestone and olive trees. I can only be truly with them if I return and share their experiences. Second, the eternal presence of Jesus, one of my primary teachers, as I live—albeit two millennia later—the land, the air, the water, the earth he lived and walked. Third, the Mediterranean light, which I wish to understand and use deeply as a photographer. Fourth, a Jewish friend I’ve become close to, sharing her fears about a loss of protection of Jews in Israel and everywhere, including in our own country with the possible recent eruption of fascism and anti-Semitism. Fifth and finally, Jewish Voice for Peace (JVP), mostly young, chutzpah-filled Jews who object to and struggle against Israel’s occupation and siege.

I, JVP, and a growing number of others call for BDS—Boycott, Divest, Sanction—a position many Jews vociferously reject, while state legislatures and the congress pass laws criminalizing this form of nonviolent advocacy for Palestinian rights. I have found my comrades. My Jewish woman friend and I, despite divergent views on the general topic, find some common ground thru the fervent application of compassion—and agapic love.

Along the way I’m learning about Talmudic thinking, which I understand is the practice of holding multiple, apparently contradictory truths simultaneously. This has allowed me to more fully appreciate seemingly conflicting points of view.

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November 12-13, 1960, some 1000 Quakers vigiled at the Pentagon against nuclear weapons.

I need Talmudic thinking with another of my core communities, Quakers. We exhibit many points of view, few supporting BDS, but we work together, united by common traditions and beliefs, feeling ourselves family. Working with my Quaker family helps me daily to try to understand varying points of view while not allowing myself to lapse into deadly silence. In fact, my local Quaker meeting, Friends Meeting at Cambridge, and another of my core communities, the Agape Community, a lay Catholic nonviolence community in central Massachusetts, along with my biological family and JVP, extend my network of faith in action. We hold each other accountable, we support and “elder” (using Quaker terminology) each other, that is, lovingly differ with and teach each other.

A great wind is ablowin and I expect it will eventually result in the salvation and renewal of that land called Holy.

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Final session of the national membership meeting of Jewish Voice for Peace, Chicago, April 2017

LINKS

A memoir I wrote in 2007 about my involvement with Palestine-Israel, with many illustrations, “Israel, Palestine, Kaleidoscope”

Currently I attempt to link Detroit and Palestine via water justice.

I’m part of two New England Quaker teams, local and regional, advocating for freedom, justice, peace, security, and reconciliation between Palestine and Israel.

Boycott-Divest-Sanction (BDS)

Talmudic thinking is summed up in the phrase “Turn and turn the Torah.” When an answer is developed, it is not the end, but only the beginning of a new question. The Talmudic way of thinking is the seeking of ever-new ways to see. It is the practice to seek ever new ways to think of Torah….

Accounts from my journal, written while I photographed Detroit in June 2017—or writing later. For three days of my first week in Detroit I attended the Second International Gathering of Social Movements on Water. Here are my notes from the first two days.

PHOTOS

Detroit-water_conferenceIMG_6249

June 9, 2017, Friday, Detroit

Illness might follow restoration of water because of bacteria and other debris left in the pipes and flushed out and into stomachs and throats. I am a test case [drinking from my home water system which had been shut down for months—no apparent illness].

Henry Ford hospital had been researching this but Mayor Duggins (“the emergency manager who calls himself mayor,” quoting Rev Rowe) pressured the hospital to stop, first not to release, then to entirely stop, claims Maureen Taylor, one of the gathering organizers.

Special Rapporteur on water, Dr Leo Heller, Brazilian, via Skype to the conference claimed there has been some progress toward making the right to water a universal human right (a question I asked), citing various cases. So denying water can become illegal.

Main goal is to force low-income (and Black?) people out of Detroit, claims Rowe, which provides a strong link with water rights in Palestine: force people out.

Other links between Michigan and Palestine might be to use water as punishment in Detroit and as control in Palestine. In addition to simple exploitation of limited resources.

I should read my water meter before and after to assess my use [which I did, giving information to my house, K, to use in settling billing]

West Grand Blvd. once the city limits and site of upper class homes [now largely deteriorated].

Chief Caleen Sisk, spiritual leader of the Winnemem Wintu Tribe, California

Chief Caleen Sisk, spiritual leader of the Winnemem Wintu Tribe, California

Power of water blessing when said in a Native American language.

United Auto Workers will help with water justice struggles, claimed Cindy Estrada, a UAW official.

Valerie Jean Blakely, water rights activist, Detroit

Valerie Jean Blakely, water rights activist, Detroit

Stories of two women who’d experienced shut offs, one had child taken but child walked home in the dark.

Possibility that city either willfully mismanages accounts to generate income or is derelict in bookkeeping, cf K’s problems.

Shut off entire neighborhoods.

Spread costs of broken mains or continually running water in abandoned houses to other customers, claims woman on Friday panel.

“Not a bankrupt city but controlled by a bankrupt system,” quoting Rowe.

Man from New Orleans exiled to Birmingham Alabama for 5 yrs before returning to city. Compares New Orleans to Detroit, gentrifying the city with mostly white, mid and high income people.

Lower East Ward [once largely Black and low-income] now filled with more affluent people.

Two young women on bus work against corporate interests in Boston, webinar coming up to develop grass-roots action.

No bottled water allowed at the conference.

What sticks for me from talks are assertions and stories?

Baxter Jones

Baxter Jones, water justice activist, Detroit

Example of Baxter Jones, in a wheelchair, who’d been jailed for his water justice activism—sumud [steadfastness].

MORE NOTES AFTER DAY TWO

My entirely different reaction: too much taking at us and not enough, barely any, participation by us.

The gathering uses the old model of conference organizing: the banking model, experts fill students with info. Virtually non-stop, running late, a fair amount of repetition (Rowe and Nicole spoke today but also the evening before). Hopefully this does not model their grassroots organizing methods.

Large number of large people, mostly women, mostly Black, but not entirely. Many infirm.

Very few travel mugs, most drank out of Styrofoam cups. Suggesting the water focus may not spread to the entire environment.

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Women definitely predominate, organizers, leaders, and participants.

Relative absence of the organization We the People of Detroit, Nadia an exception who gave for me clearly the best presentation of her panel—focused, concise, well crafted, illustrated beautifully by a slide show despite the use of power points. (Nadia explained that and Monica Lewis-Patrick, co-founder of We the People is at another conference).

Kids can no longer stay in homes without water [removed by the city].

Where are the extended bios of speakers?

Did Detroit once use only private wells, i.e., did everyone long ago have their own free water? Trace the progression from personal and private to collective and public. Adding a fee structure.

60,000 + another 18,000 cutoffs.

A man plays with his computer on the large screen behind the speakers, which is incessantly annoying. Altho occasionally he shows relevant images.

Detroit’s City Charter states a right to water and sanitation (Roger Bolton). CHECK THIS

Pre-Trump (now called “45” so we don’t use his name, as in 45th president) EPA recommended a sliding scale for water rates.

Org LIFTUP worked with several cities to establish more equitable payment plans but they served only a small proportion of customers. And shoves blame for non-payment onto the nonpaying customer, rather than addressing the unjust system.

Baltimore one of the worst cities for water and sewage infrastructure. Users have to pay for repair, when once the feds would help.

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How can the unearned income tax credit help people behind in paying water bills?

Roger Bolton (Belmont MA-based?) drafted the Detroit bill for water rights.

California the first state declaring water is a human rights—ask L.

In Puerto Rico, coal combustion produces coal dust which is then used as fill and cover but this pollutes aquifers.

Write a story about the panelists, their back-stories, what led them to this work, what they sacrifice, what they achieve?

An entirely different spirit from that of the Jewish Voice for Peace national membership meeting I attend in March. Here there is little joy, the spirit is deadening rather than enlivening. I left at end of afternoon on Friday, unable to remain for the evening because I was exhausted rather than energized.

How define affordability? What plan can work to make water affordable? How calculate ability to pay?

Philly as a possible model, something like 1-3% of annual income billable for water and sewage.

The irony of Detroit surrounded by water (Great Lakes and innumerable rivers), yet many people suffer without water.

Great lakes hold 28% of the world’s surface water.

60% of Detroiters do not have sufficient income to pay for necessities, water specifically.

Shigellosis is a water-borne disease, afflicting some people in Flint and Detroit. How many total, and what proportion of entire population and the population experiencing water shut offs?

Check out Highland Park. First with water cutoffs? Before Detroit?

CASPER is a Detroit medical survey.

If proposed guidelines (by whom?) were followed, 80% of Detroit would be eligible for help paying their water bills.

Review Ford hospital study and the story about its squelching by Duggins.

Check out the water hotline on We the People of Detroit and inform K.

Have our water tested, the link is on We the People.

Story of salmon as transformational creatures, salt to fresh water, eg, finding way back to spawning grounds. (Native woman on Fri from Calif)

Microphone as a talking stick—does this allow the native woman to talk endlessly?

Flint: the activist organization [which one?] makes broad demands, not only about water, but pipes, rates, single payer health, emergency manager.

National campaign for lead free water

Hear from Melissa Mays, a key Flint activist, and [later] her 2 sons, 12 and 14, plus an older son, all with health problems related to lead (“growing pains,” but more serious and enduring and endangering than ordinary growing pains).

Water-related illness creates “foggy brain” in kids and they are then declared “behavior kids” and suspended and thrown out.

FlintH20justice—FaceBook page.

Read People’s Tribune.

Did I pay $100 for the conference, with $5 per day for food?

State Water Legislative Working Group—bills and hearing, attend some. (Stephanie Chang)

Renewed Poor Peoples’ Campaign (without the encampment), 50th anniversary next year.

Purpose of emergency manager is to steal assets like water. Look at patterns of which cities get the EMs.

Fresh, safe, affordable water.

Watch movie, “Something in the Water” [part of the America Divided series?]

Photos of Detroit light brigade and bat signals

Detroit-water_conferenceIMG_6312

LINKS

Flinth20justice (Facebook)

Are Detroit water shutoffs and illnesses related?” Bridge Magazine, by Joel Kurth

TO BE CONTINUED

Accounts from my journal, written while I photographed Detroit in June 2017—or writing later.

I come from Detroit where it’s rough and I’m not a smooth talker.

—Eminem

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Youth activist on water rights

PHOTOS

June 7, 2017, Wednesday, Detroit

Letter to S:

i’m in detroit, settling into my home away from home. the water man turned on our water this afternoon. G [my neighbor across the street] finally returned my phone call (as i stood yesterday afternoon in boston awaiting the boarding of a late train—believe it or not, the train originates in boston—and showed up this morning with the key just as w dropped me at the house. w picked me up at the dearborn train station, i treated her to a mideast breakfast at my favorite local mideast bakery, the new yasmeen, in dearborn. i also picked up a load of treats, stuffed grape leaves, stuffed cabbage leaves, humus, and a variety of arab sweets.

my iphone problems continue vexing me. phone and messaging work well and add much to my work here, as does the internet. but linking to my laptop for internet, the hotspot routine—if it connects and it’s spotty—is extremely show. i always have the local mcdonalds.

i perused my list of contacts to further photograph my two main themes for this trip, water justice and public schools. the water conference begins thurs, runs thru sun, and at the very least i’ll learn much more about water justice-injustice here and make some valuable connections. the principal of the local public k-8 school seems to be avoiding me. no time for an appointment tomorrow “but she’ll get back to you.” unlikely. 

two new contacts have materialized, a man (i might have mentioned him), mb, who’s part of a pro bono team bringing a suit against the state of michigan about literacy rights in the public schools, and his daughter, s, who just graduated from harvard ed and has been filming related to the suit. i spoke with her a few hrs ago and i might photograph and possibly film a major event occurring next week about struggles over public ed.

k, the owner of the house i stay in, is due here any minute. we may put the furniture back after she had wood flooring installed. and then, early to bed. 

i slept very little on the crowded train, joined during the middle of the night by a young woman heading to chicago so i scrunched into one seat. as the conductor informed us, monday kicked off school vacation summer. (not quite for massachusetts but elsewhere apparently). as the sun set last night, we were in iroquois confederacy territory, along the mohawk river, the clouds black outlined and looming. then rain fell, continuing thru the night. clear this morning in detroit, followed by more bulbous threatening clouds which teamed up to alternately block and allow the sunlight. 

it’s cool here in detroit, mid 60s, and windy. not much to stop the winds from blowing in from the plains. temps may hit near 90 here later this week. i guess you had more murky chilly weather today and maybe tomorrow.

IS THE WATER TURNED ON IN MY HOUSE?

Fulfilling my duties as house husband I happened to be home yesterday when the Detroit water man returned to turn on the water. I accompanied him downstairs, thinking I might learn how to turn on water myself, if needed, but he only checked the meter’s condition. Outside, I watched him from the porch as he found the water valve buried about 3 ft under the front yard, pulled up the covering, and with a tool on a long rod restored our water. Too late I thought to grab my camera and photograph him. He was amiable and chatty, working for Homrich, a company that also does demolitions. He explained the large machine on the truck’s back was an air compressor. They use it to clear holes stuffed with dirt by house owners trying to prevent shut offs. I didn’t tell him we might meet again—with my camera.

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Rev. Edwin Rowe, member of People’s Water Board Coalition, Public Health Committee

June 8, 2017, Thursday

MY LEADS SEEM MOSTLY FEMALE

I notice that nearly all my leads and contacts have been female: first AR who I met at Friends General Gathering in Johnstown Penn in the late 1990s; leading to K who offered her house in summer 2010 so Rick, Grove, I and others would have a home while we attended the US Social Forum; reconnecting with W who I’d met at another FGC gathering in maybe the early 1990s (who introduced me to the Swords Into Plowshares Peace Gallery where I had my first Detroit show, the 1995 Auschwitz to Hiroshima pilgrimage with Billy Ledger); and then more recently, KS, KR, G, and a few other women. RF and Johnny are gender exceptions.

Is this because women find me attractive? Hardly. Is it because women are more likely than men to help others? I believe so.

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Melissa Mays, coordinator of Water You Fighting For ?, Flint Michigan

At any rate, I’d like to highlight the roles of two other women in my Detroit project, W and SR. SR drove me to the Boston train station, helping me over a large hurdle because of all my gear, especially my bike. She’s done this repeatedly. In addition she tends my house when I’m gone, mail, plants, oversight, etc.

W has fed me innumerable leads, including the most recent one at the Swords Gallery where she once was on the board. She’s lent me her car, and might again for this trip; she’s hosted home shows; she’s sent me info; and with husband G has proven steadfast as friend. Minus AR, minus K, and minus W I might not be able to do this project, especially if I had to rely on men.

Besides providing housing, K is a confidant. Yesterday during our long phone conversation I told her how living here in Detroit is like returning to live to Chicago’s South Side, my boyhood home that my parents forced me to abandon for our move to the suburbs. Previously I’d told her about my life with S, its ups and downs, once at length confiding to her our problems over art, how critical I am of hers and perhaps she of mine. K tells me about her old boy friend M—the odd one—and other men, and about her health problems, and perhaps most importantly about this house. I am a silent partner in her house, helping her, possibly knowing her house better than she herself does in its present condition. This is crucial to both of us.

Maureen Taylor, conference co organizer

Maureen Taylor, water conference co-organizer

TEMPORARILY NO HOME, NO WATER, AND NO ELECTRICITY

Being an honorary Detroiter I reluctantly experience what other Detroiters might experience: no home when I worried about getting in, meeting G with a key. No water when I lived in this home for about 24 hours without water. And yesterday no electricity for about 6 hours.

Around 2 pm yesterday while listening to the radio and doing computer work, suddenly the radio cut out and seemed to produce a high-pitched, screeching noise. Oh, probably just an emergency test alert on the radio, I thought. It continued. Searching, I discovered the radio was not the audio source; but a wall device, either smoke detector or burglar alarm, was wailing, signaling power outage.

Just my home? Looking out front I saw a neighbor across the street, maybe Anthony’s father, in front of his house looking puzzled. Is this a neighborhood phenomenon? So I crossed the street, found Antony and his dad sitting on their front porch. Their first question to me was, do you have electricity? That clinched the question: neighborhood power outage. Earlier I’d heard a siren. Looking around I detected nothing unusual.

My Internet still worked so, searching for Detroit power outages, I found on DTE’s website, the power provider, a map that showed numerous outages around the city, a big one affecting some 500 houses in my neighborhood. I decided to go for the afternoon bike ride I’d promised myself, as much to bike as to buy booze and a few other items I didn’t remember on my first shopping trip. Starting out down Buena Vista I saw DTE utility trucks and about 1/2 mile from here a fire truck. Biking over, blocked by emergency tape, I inquired: live wires down, maybe wind, stay back!

All 3 of these problems—no home, no water, no electricity—were short-lived and minor, easily corrected. I have privilege, I have community, I have skills, and I am not worried, not too worried. Worried just enough to activate and to appreciate what others go thru.

In a few days I’ll attend the four day long water conference, expecting to gain insights, leads, and portraits of key participants in the local and international struggles for water justice. Regarding water rights, I will keep an eye out for links between Palestine and the rest of the world, notably Michigan.

DetroitFromWindsor_6693-Pano

Detroit from Windsor Ontario

LINKS

We The People of Detroit

Water Justice Journey Resource Packet

TO BE CONTINUED

Wethepeopleofdetroit logo

As I prepare to travel to Detroit in a few days for most of June 2017, intending to knuckle down on two main themes, water justice and public education, with good leads in both areas, I’ve written this statement. 

An examination of the shifting dynamics in the country’s iconic post-industrial city. I hope to reveal aspects of Detroit beyond what’s now termed “Ruin Porn” and the starkly contrasting ultra beautiful and expensive development.

Public schools such as Noble Elementary valiantly struggle to survive and offer high quality public education. I wish to portray this struggle. I’ve photographed the Boggs School, as one example of this struggle, and plan to again on my upcoming trip in June. I also photographed the now tragically closed Detroit Friends School.

Detroit-Boggs_School-9297

Boggs School

Detroit-Friends_School-3765

“? of the day: which would make the best model to show the structure of the inside of the earth? a. baseketball, b. solid rock, c. hard boiled egg, d. a rubber band ball

Detroit Friends School

I’ll work with We The People of Detroit, an organization co-founded and co-directed by Monica Lewis-Patrick and return to the Boggs School for their closing parade and block party.

I have been photographing, making movies, and writing about Detroit since 2010, initially awed by the abandoned and scrapped buildings and the enormous swaths of vacant land. Later I learned about burgeoning urban agriculture, the arts movement, numerous civic projects, innovative reuse of buildings, the rise of bicycling. Big Money pours in to build sports stadiums and commercial and residential housing. Little Money dribbles in to the remaining 80% of the area, inhabited mostly by African-American and other economically suffering people, many suffering from the recent bankruptcy of the city.

I ponder: will Detroit become the model for postindustrial urban resurrection or self implode?

I was raised on Chicago’s Southside from 1940 to 1955 when my family ignobly was the first to flee African Americans searching for new housing. I have always been ashamed of this part of my family history and recently realized that by returning regularly to Detroit, living in a Black neighborhood, part of the 80% land mass, I have returned. I’ve made friends among my neighbors, developed a portrait series about them, and I’ve interviewed some about changes in their neighborhood. The white owner of the house I stay in was educated very happily at Noble Elementary School. If I can gain the permission of its principal, Latoyia Webb-Harris, and staff and parents and students, I hope to show its current life.

LINKS

We The People of Detroit

James and Grace Lee Boggs Center to Nurture Community Leadership

Water justice in Detroit

Betsy DeVos and the twilight of public education

[The meeting ] has been about much more than naming oppressions. We danced (some of us), sang, laughed, wept, mourned, strategized, debated and disagreed and most importantly we dreamed. We dreamed of a beloved community.—Nyle Fort [one of the presenters]

IMG_5291

This description is not hyperbole. My 3 days in Chicago (my hometown) were extraordinary, often brought me to tears. In large measure this was the perfect storm of mystery, political action, and soulfulness, ritually enlivened by the best practises of Judaism. It is all and more what I’ve long desired for Quakers–no split between holiness, love, and political action.

Love, joy, outrage, smart thinking, argumentation, energy, cooperation, innovation, singing, dancing flooded the meeting of over 1000 participants—and of course the stuff of conferences, meeting and learning. I was in tears twice on the last day, first during the morning plenary which was meditative, based on the power of rocks. I wept because I felt I was so perfectly in the right place, with a community that melds spirituality and political action. We sang Jewish, prayed Jewish, danced Jewish, lit candles Jewish, and tried to fully embody Jewish justice traditions. In some weird way, I may be more Jewish than some of my Jewish buddies. Without the pedigree probably.

Secondly, our closing included words from the Palestinian activist, Rasmea Odeh, whose trial I attended in Detroit two years ago and who has now offered a plea bargain–voluntary deportation, no prison, no fine. A Black activist from the baptist preacher tradition, Nyle Fort, and Linda Sarsour, one of the main organizers of the DC Women’s March, Brooklyn born, Muslim, wears the hijab, and has been wildly targeted, joined her, all three pushing us up on our feet.

Fortress Truman

Campus Safety and Security is available 24 hours a day to ensure a safe and secure environment for all City College students, staff members, and visitors.

—Truman College, Chicago

Truman_College_Building

Truman College is a Chicago community college a few blocks from St Francis House of Hospitality where I periodically stay in the Uptown neighborhood on the North Side. Since the early 1990s Truman College has been an oasis for me. I’ve attended workshops and talks there, perused the walls for information about community events, eaten in the cafeteria, and read quietly and peacefully. Truman College hosted an exhibition of my photographs about Native Americans. A few days ago, I’d hoped to visit Truman for many of the same reasons, especially to learn about community events.

St Francis House-Jimmy

The late house resident, Jimmy, on the porch of St Francis House of Hospitality

A big change: security. Private uniformed security officials sat at a desk immediately inside the main entrance, a twisted form of “Welcome Desk.” Electronic turnstiles admitted only those with sufficient credentials. I asked, may I come in? Why? To check bulletin boards for local events and grab a cup of coffee. No. Sorry.

Truman College, a public institution, is now gated. As is much of our nation.

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Train platform, Wilson Station

Perhaps an incident occurred at the college that precipitated this security. A robbery or violent assault. Such incidents are often used to justify increased security. The “Shoe Bomber,” carrying an explosive of some sort, apparently attempting to blow up a plane, led to x-raying removed shoes at airports. Are such incidents, often leading to irreversible policy changes, sufficient reason to dramatically increase security?

Or the neighborhood which draws unhoused or homeless people. Are they a threat? They could be offered a safe place out of the maddening crowd, warm, a place to rest, use the toilet, perhaps sold a moderately priced cup of coffee. Similar to the neighborhood McDonald’s which seems, by comparison, inordinately hospitable.

As of this writing, of the 77 Chicago community areas, Uptown ranked between 39th (violent crime) and 61st (property crime), hardly a high crime area.

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Wilson Station being renovated

I recall airports with minimal security. No need to remove shoes, laptops, jackets, etc, to be scanned. I recall universities with open libraries for browsing (for decades I visited the architecture library at MIT to explore photography books, a major form of my photographic education.) I recall state and federal office buildings without security. I recall neighborhoods, including the South Side of Chicago where I grew up in the 1940s and 1950s, where we kids played freely late into summer evenings. And I recall a time, an era, that was happily relatively open,relatively welcoming, relatively fearless.

The police fear Black people; thus we experience a wave of police murdering African-Americans, usually Black Males, often females as well, not as well-known. On my first evening in Chicago I attended a police accountability meeting in Uptown, one in a series to increase civilian supervision of police activity.

This nation, the most powerful in history, with a military costing more than the militaries of the next 8 nations combined, has become a people suffocated in fear. The president calls for a 10%, $54 billion increase in the military budget, while slashing money for housing, medical care, education, the environment. The military now demands more than $600 billion annually, enough to build thousands more schools, tens of thousands more homes, develop hundreds of miles of regional public transportation, and easily pay for an exterior paint job for St Francis House.

Fear rules the soul but wisdom can overcome fear. Wisdom, courage, bravery, and insight can open the doors of community resources. Truman College can once again be a refuge, a center of community activity, a beacon of what is best in the American people—welcoming, trusting, loving.

Since 1976, Truman College has been a vibrant and vital part of Chicago’s Uptown neighborhood, delivering high-quality, innovative, affordable and accessible educational opportunities and services.

—Truman College

LINKS

Is Uptown Safe?

Crime in Uptown

Uptown

Accounts from my journal, written while I photographed Detroit for three weeks during the end of summer 2016—or writing later.

Quakers to Refineries (photos)
Added November 23, 2016

Johnny’s Neighborhood (movie)

I find myself at a crossroads with this project, nearly 7 years since I began it. Now I cannot decide what to do next—consider the active photography ended, make small changes in my direction, or make major changes like devise a new strategy. Do I have too much brick and mortar, i.e., buildings, and not enough blood and guts, i.e., people? I wonder, for you the viewer, of the dynamic I have studied and tried to photograph, what comes thru?

To gain some clarity I’ve joined a group exhibition at my Quaker meeting in Cambridge Massachusetts. In my portion of the exhibit, referencing the exhibit theme “Hope Springs Eternal,” rather than show only finished exhibition size prints  I chose to show a set of thumbnail prints, each about 1.5 by 2 inches on 13 by 19 paper.  I ask you, the viewer, to vote by noting file names of photos that interest you, and sending me the names. My late mentor, Andy Towl, once asked me, when you view an exhibit, Skip, what stops you?

What if anything in my array of these small photos from one of my six sessions at Motor City (rapidly becoming Bicycle City) stops you? Please let your eye dance across the images, with as little conscious thought as possible. What strikes you?

If you click on the array below, you’ll see a matrix or grid. You can then click on the array, individual grids will pop up, and you can use the arrow keys to run thru the set. To enlarge the image so you can read the file names of individual thumbnail sets, please click on “view full size.” You can easily comment in the space on the lower left of the unenlarged grid. (A little complicated, I realize.)

Feel free to comment to this blog, write me at skipschiel@gmail.com or phone me at 617-441-7756.

I plan to return to Detroit in June, mainly for urban agriculture and events commemorating the 50th anniversary of the uprising.

Here’s my general statement:

Searching for the Seeds of the New Detroit Miracle

An examination of the shifting dynamics in the country’s iconic post-industrial city

I have been photographing, making movies, and writing about Detroit since 2010, when I attended the U.S. Social Forum that summer, initially awed by the abandoned and scrapped buildings and the enormous swaths of vacant land. Later I learned about burgeoning urban agriculture, the arts movement, numerous civic projects, innovative reuse of buildings, the rise of bicycling, Big Money pouring in to build sports stadiums and commercial and residential housing, etc.

The inner core, some 20% of the land thrives with the injection of Big Money, largely from local billionaire entrepreneurs. Paramount among them, Dan Gilbert, the founder and chief of Quicken Loans, and the late (died Feb. 2017 at 87) Mike Ilitch, founder and owner of Little Caesars Pizza. Together they might own more than three-quarters of the newly developed property such as sports stadiums, office buildings, and luxury housing. Black and largely economically suffering people, many suffering from the recent bankruptcy of the city, inhabit the remaining 80% of the area.

I was raised on Chicago’s Southside from 1940 to 1955 when my family ignobly was the first to flee African-Americans searching for new housing. I have always been ashamed of this part of my family history and recently realized that by returning regularly to Detroit, living in a Black neighborhood, part of the 80% land mass, I have returned. I’ve made friends among my neighbors, developed a portrait series about them, and I’ve interviewed some about changes in their neighborhood.

Influenced by mentors Robert Frank and his book, The Americans, and W. Eugene Smith with his Pittsburgh Project, I hope to reveal aspects of Detroit beyond what’s now termed “Ruin Porn” and ultra beautiful and expensive development. I hope to portray the dynamic between Big and Little Money, development and gentrification of the urban core fed by Big Money, and the effects on housing, education, water access, urban agriculture, and economic development in the periphery, resulting from Little Money. This includes reduced pensions and health benefits of civil retirees and, to a lesser extent, police and firefighters.

2017 marks the 50th anniversary of what some call “The Uprising,” others “The Riots,” marking a new phase in Detroit’s demotion from what had been named “The Paris of the West.” And now? I intend to continue my photographic exploration. As W. Eugene Smith has stated, “Truth is my prejudice.”

I ponder: will Detroit become the model for post-industrial urban resurrection or self implode?

TO BE CONTINUED

LINKS

Anniversary of Uprising

Turning Derelict Buildings into an Urban Farm in Detroit

Riverwise magazine

James and Grace Lee Boggs Center for Community Leadership